Algae (Mediterranean) (Ulva sp.)

An algae specific to the Mediterranean. Use: Rich in minerals, amino acids, and organic silicon (see definitions of amino acids and organic silicon), it is the source of an extract with cleansing and draining properties, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Algae (green) (Chlorella vulgaris)

Microscopic algae found in freshwater. Use: Green alga is a source of an active ingredient rich in peptides and amino acids (see definitions of peptides and amino acids). This active ingredient has proven firming action, as it stimulates collagen synthesis (see definition of collagen).

 

Allantoin

Active molecule widely used in cosmetics to soothe and rejuvenate.

 

Almond (Prunus amygdalus)

While Native to Asia, the Almond Tree is grown in the Mediterranean region. Traditional uses: The nuts provide nourishing, softening oil.

 

Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis)

Aloe grows in the tropics of eastern and southern Africa, its native land. Traditional uses: The leaves are the source of aloe vera gel, with nourishing, protective, and cleansing properties.

 

Aluminum chlorohydrate

Aluminum compound, an active ingredient that limits perspiration.

 

Amino acids

Organic molecules are the basic units of peptides (see definition of peptides). The main amino acids represent the genetic code.

 

Apple (Pyrus malus)

Apple is a fruit tree cultivated worldwide. Use: Apple seeds are the source of a proven anti-wrinkle ingredient (strengthens the collagen network and stimulates collagen synthesis).

 

Argan (Argania spinosa)

The Argan tree is native to Morocco and grows only in Morocco and a small area in Algeria. Traditional uses: The kernels of the Argan fruit are the source of an oil well-known for its anti-aging properties. Grinding or crushing these kernels also produces exfoliating particles that are particularly gentle on the skin.

 

Arnica Montana (Arnica montana)

Grows mainly in Central Europe, North America, and Siberia. Use: Arnica flowers are a source of an ingredient which, when combined with Soy, St. John's Wort, and White Willow, is used to discourage hair growth (see definitions of Soy, St. John's Wort, and White Willow). It has been proven effective, slowing hair growth and reducing its length and diameter.

 

Ash (Fraxinus excelsior)

Ash is native to Europe and grows well there. Use: Ash leaves are the source of an extract with diuretic properties, hence their use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Baobab (Adansonia digitata)

The Baobab grows wild throughout Africa, its native land. Traditional uses: The kernels of the Baobab fruit are the source of an oil with softening, nourishing, and regenerating properties.

 

Beeswax (Cera alba)

Wax produced by bees and used to make honeycombs. Use: Used in cosmetics to provide rich textures and nourishment of the skin.

 

Birch (Betula pendula)

Birch grows in Europe and the temperate regions of Asia and North America. Use: Birch leaves are the source of an extract with cleansing and draining properties, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Borage (Barago officinalis)

Native to southern Spain and Morocco, Borage grows throughout the Mediterranean basin. Traditional use: The seeds are the source of very rich, nourishing oil.

 

Caviar (salmon) or red caviar

Obtained from salmon eggs. Use: Salmon caviar is the source of an active ingredient that has a high amino-acid and peptide content (see definitions of amino acids and peptides). This active ingredient has proven nutritional and regenerating properties.

 

Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

Though native to Europe, Chicory is also grown in North Africa and Asia. Use: Chicory roots are the source of an extract with diuretic properties, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia)

Cinnamon is originally from Sri Lanka and India and grows in tropical forests. Traditional use: The bark, when distilled, is the source of an essential oil with stimulating properties.

 

Coffee (green) (Coffea arabica)

Native to east Africa, Coffee is grown throughout the tropics. Traditional use: The fruit, or bean, is the source of an extract with a high concentration of caffeine, an active ingredient well-known for stimulating slimming.

 

Collagen

A protein found in the body, secreted by the cells. Responsible for skin’s cohesion and structure.

 

Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

Native to the Middle East, Cornflower grows in temperate regions. Traditional uses: When steam distilled, the flower extract is used to produce floral water that has been used for centuries for eye problems.

 

Cosmetic (legal definition of a cosmetic product)

Any substance or preparation intended to be used in contact with various parts of the human body (epidermis, hair system, nails, lips, and external genital organs), or the teeth and oral mucosa, with the exclusive or primary intent of cleaning or perfuming them, changing their appearance, and/or correcting body odors and/or protecting the body parts or keeping them in good condition. Article L5131-1 of the French Public Health Code. Council Directive 76/768/EEC of July 27, 1976.

 

Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

Probably originally from northern India, the Cucumber has been cultivated for over 3,000 years. Traditional use: The fruit is the source of an extract with softening and soothing properties.

 

Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)

A native of the Mediterranean basin, Cypress grows in Turkey and the Mediterranean. Traditional use: The branches, when distilled, produce an essential oil with calming properties.

 

Damascus rose (Rosa damascena)

Primarily grown in Turkey and Bulgaria. Traditional use: When distilled, the flowers are the source of a floral water naturally enriched with Rose essential oil, which has stimulating properties and controls excess sebum production.


Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Dandelion grows around the world. Use: Dandelion roots are the source of an extract with cleansing and draining properties, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Dipalmitoyl hydroxyproline

A molecule derived from specific collagen amino acids (see definitions of amino acids and collagen). This molecule has proven plumping, firming, and anti-aging properties.

 

Essential fatty acids

Natural fatty acids, meaning those of animal or plant origin, which the body cannot synthesize or can only synthesize in very small quantities. They are used in cosmetics for their tremendous nourishing and softening properties for the skin. Gamma-linoleic acid is one of the fatty acids with these properties.

 

Essential oil

Essential oils are volatile and odorous substances produced naturally by certain plants. They are true concentrations of active ingredients in plants and have multiple beneficial properties. The conventional method of extracting essential oils is steam distillation:  In the still, water vapor is passed over the plants. When this steam comes out of the container, it is enriched with the plants’ essential oil and is then condensed in a coil that is kept cold. The collected liquid is composed of essential oil and floral water. The two liquids are separated by density difference in a device called a separator or essencier. The essential oil is actually lighter than the water and floats on the water’s surface.

 

Floral water

The conventional method for obtaining floral water is steam distillation: In the still, water vapor is passed over the plants. When this steam comes out of the container, it is enriched with the plants’ active ingredients and is then condensed in a coil that is kept cold. The collected liquid is composed of essential oil and floral water. The two liquids are separated by density difference in a device called a separator or essencier. The floral water is naturally enriched with traces of essential oils, which add their benefits to the floral water.

 

Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

Native to Asia, Ginger is grown in the tropics. Traditional use: When distilled, the rhizome provides an essential oil with stimulating properties, as well as another stimulating extract.

 

Glaucine

A molecule proven to help the body rid itself of stored fat. Recommended for slimming products.

Grape (Vitis vinifera)

Fruit of the Red Grapevine (see the definition of Red Grapevine). Use: Extracts from grape juice, when combined with Saxifrage, Scutellaria, and Mulberry (see definitions of Saxifrage, Mulberry, and Scutellaria), produce an active ingredient with proven skin-lightening properties.

 

Guarana (Paullinia cupana)

Native to the Amazon rainforest, Guarana is grown in Brazil. Traditional use: The seeds are the source of an extract rich in caffeine, a well-known active ingredient in slimming products. The extract also has a basal metabolism accelerator (increased energy consumption by the body), hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Hamamelis (Hamamelis virginiana)

A native of Canada and the eastern United States, Witch Hazel is also found in Europe. Traditional use: The leaves, when processed through distillation, are the source of soothing floral water.

 

Hibiscus (Hibiscus esculentus)

Hibiscus is native to southern Asia and Africa. Use: Hibiscus proteins provide oligopeptides (see definition of oligopeptides) that have proven anti-wrinkle action.

 

Honey

One of the many products from beehives, and by far the best-known and most used. Use: Used in cosmetics for its nourishing properties. Combining it with Propolis and Royal Jelly (see definitions of Propolis and Royal Jelly) creates an active ingredient for moisturizing the skin.

 

Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)

The Horse Chestnut is native to the Balkans and Turkey and is grown in temperate regions. Traditional use: The seeds or nuts are the source of an extract that stimulates circulation.

 

Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis)

Jojoba is native to and is grown in Arizona and Mexico. Traditional use: The seeds are the source of a wax commonly called jojoba oil. This rich oil has nourishing properties.

 

Kigelia (Kigelia africana)

Kigelia is a plant native to Africa. Traditional use: The sausage-shaped fruit provides an active ingredient with firming properties.

 

Kokum (Garcinia indica)

Kokum is native to India. Traditional use: The seeds are the source of a nourishing, emollient butter.

 

Macadamia (Macadamia ternifolia)

The Macadamia is native and is grown in Australia. Traditional use: Macadamia nuts are the source of an oil with nourishing and emollient properties.

 

Mate (Ilex paraguariensis)

Native to South America, Mate is grown in Spain and Portugal. Traditional use: The leaves are the source of an extract rich in caffeine, a well-known active ingredient for slimming products
.

 

Mallow (Malva sylvestris)

Mallow is native to Asia and Europe. Traditional use: The flowers are the source of an extract with softening, emollient, and decongestant properties.

 

Meadowsweet (Spirea ulmaria)

Native to Europe, Meadowsweet grows in any damp soil. Use: The plant is the source of an extract with cleansing and draining properties, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.


Melaleuca (Melaleuca alternifolia) or Tea Tree

Melaleuca is native to and grows in Australia. Traditional use: Through distillation, the leaves provide an essential oil with cleansing properties.


Melon (Cucuminus melo)

Native to India and Africa, Melon is widely cultivated throughout the world. Traditional use: The fruit is the source of an extract with stimulating properties.

 

Menthyl PCA

A refreshing, cooling ingredient that causes a feeling of instant freshness that lasts.

 

Mulberry (Morus bombycis)

Mulberry grows in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Use: Extracts from Mulberry roots, when combined with Saxifrage, Grape, and Scutellaria (see definitions of Saxifrage, Grape, and Scutellaria), produce an active ingredient with proven skin-lightening properties.

 

Myrothamnus flabellifolia

This plant grows wild in South African desert regions. Use: As it is able to adapt to drastic conditions, the plant has developed some astounding properties. It is the source of an active ingredient with proven properties providing long-lasting skin moisturizing and protection for skin damaged by the cold and harsh external elements (cold, UV rays, thermal shock, etc.).

 

Oil macerate

These are plant extracts for which the solvents are composed solely of oil (see the definition of plant extracts). The oil used as a macerate substance comes exclusively from vegetable sources.

 

Oleic sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

Grown around the world. Traditional use: The seeds are the source of an oil  with nourishing, softening, and emollient properties. We selected an oil rich in oleic acid for greater effectiveness.

 

Olive (Olea europaea)

Though native to the Mediterranean, the olive tree is cultivated worldwide. Traditional use: Squalane is obtained naturally from Olive Oil and is a concentrate of the nourishing, softening properties found in olive oil.


Papaya (Carica papaya)

Native to Central America, papaya is grown in the tropics for its fruit. Use: Papaya leaves are the source of an extract which helps the body rid itself of stored fat, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Parabens (our products are paraben-free)

These are preservatives widely used in cosmetic products. They are regulated by legislation. Parabens have faced regular challenges regarding whether they are safe to use since 2004, with the publication of a study demonstrating the presence of parabens in breast cancer tumors. The CSCB (Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety) is responsible on the European level for issuing opinions on various topics related to public health, particularly with regard to cosmetic ingredients. These opinions lead to changes in legislation and are available for public inspection: Since this study, the CSCB launched an extensive evaluation of safety concerns related to use of parabens and issued the following opinions: January 2005: the opinion invalidates the above study due to lack of data and insufficient operating protocol in the study in October 2006: The CSCB recommends not modifying the restrictions for the methyl and ethylparaben. The industry has been asked for additional data for other parabens. June 2008: The CSCB upholds clearing of methyl and ethylparabens of safety-related concerns and is not yet able to complete the evaluations of the other parabens.

 

Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

Peppermint, a hybrid of water mint and spearmint, is grown in Europe, Asia, and North America. Traditional use: Through distillation of the leaves comes an essential oil with cleansing, refreshing properties.


Peptides (and oligopeptides)

Molecules composed of several amino acids (see definition of amino acids). These molecules have an important role in the body (hormones, neurotransmitters, etc.).

 

Pepper (Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens)

Native to the American tropics, Pepper (known by many names, such as capsicum and chili) is grown in the tropics. Traditional use: the species Capsicum annuum is the source of an macerate oil with stimulating and toning properties. The species Capsicum frutescens (Cayenne pepper) is the source of an extract with rubefacient properties (stimulates increased blood flow and causes a warming sensation).

 

Pineapple (Ananas comosus)

The Pineapple is from South America and is grown in the tropics for its fruit. Use: The Pineapple stem is the source of an extract that helps the body dispose of stored fat, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.


Plant extracts

Plant extracts are useful because they make the active ingredients found in plants, flowers, bark, roots, etc., readily available in a form that can be used in cosmetics. Glycerin is used to extract such ingredients from plants, as it is a very well-tolerated solvent. The plant (sometimes in its dry form) is macerated in glycerin. After the plants are crushed in the solvent, mixed, and macerated, the liquid is filtered.


Pomegranate (Punica granatum)

The Pomegranate is native to Asia Minor and is grown in Europe. Traditional use: The fruit is the source of an extract with stimulant properties.

 

Prickly Pear

Native to Mexico, Prickly Pear grows throughout semi-tropical regions. Traditional use: The fruit is the source of an extract with regenerative properties and is rich in vitamin C (see definition of vitamin C).

 

Primrose (evening) (Oenothera biennis)

Native to North America, evening primrose is grown in all temperate regions. Traditional use: The seeds are the source of an oil rich in gamma-linoleic acid (see definition of essential fatty acids) with nourishing and emollient properties.

 

Propolis

A resinous substance collected by bees from the buds of certain trees and transformed into a red putty inside the hive. Use: Used in cosmetics for its soothing properties. When used in combination with Honey and Royal Jelly (see definitions of Honey and Royal Jelly), it creates an active ingredient that moisturizes skin.

 

Purple Orchid (Orchis mascula)

The Purple Orchid is native to Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa. Traditional use: the Purple Orchid is the source of an extract with emollient, nourishing properties.

 

Quackgrass (Agropyron repens)

Grows in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Australia. Known by other names, such as Couch Grass and Dog-Grass. Use: Quackgrass roots are the source of an extract with diuretic properties, hence its use in weight-loss food supplements.

 

Red Grapevine (Vitis vinifera)

Native to Southern Europe and Asia, the Red Grapevine is grown in all temperate regions. It produces the Grape (see definition of Grape). Traditional use: Red Grapevine leaves are the source of an extract that helps stimulate blood circulation.

 

Royal Jelly

Royal Jelly is pearly white, gel-like substance secreted by worker bees. It is used to feed young bees during their first days of life and is reserved exclusively for the queen larvae. Use: It is used in cosmetics for its nourishing properties. Combining it with Honey and Propolis (see definitions of Honey and Propolis) creates an active ingredient for moisturizing the skin.

 

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

A native of the Mediterranean, sage is grown in all the sunny places. Traditional use: from the leaves, obtained by distillation an essential oil purifying and toning properties. Also obtained a sample with the same properties.

 

St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum)

Though native to Europe, St. John's Wort grows around the world. Use: The flowers of St. John's Wort, when combined with Soy, White Willow, and Arnica Montana (see definitions of Soy, White Willow, and Arnica Montana) is used to discourage hair growth. It has been proven effective, slowing hair growth and reducing its length and diameter.

 

Saxifrage (Saxifraga sarmentosa)

Saxifrage grows in mountainous and rocky regions. Use: The extract of this plant, when combined with Scutellaria, Mulberry, and Grape (see definitions of Scutellaria, Mulberry, and Grape), produces an active ingredient with proven skin-lightening properties.

 

Scutellaria (Scutellaria baicalensis)

Native to Asia, Scutellaria is grown mainly in China, Japan, Mongolia, Korea, and Siberia. Use: The extract of this plant, when combined with Saxifrage, Mulberry, and Grape (see definitions of Saxifrage, of Mulberry and Grape), produces an active ingredient with proven skin-lightening properties.

 

Shea butter (Butyrospermum parkii)

The Shea trea is native to West Africa. Traditional use: The kernels of the fruit are the source of a nourishing, emollient butter.

 

Silicon (organic)

Natural botanic source of silicon. Silicon is a metalloid chemical element (meaning it cannot be classified as either a metal or in a non-metal), the most abundant element after oxygen. Use: Organic silicon is the source of an active ingredient that slows the effects of aging by improving skin’s elasticity by restructuring the skin’s collagen network (see definition of collagen). It has been proven effective.

 

Soy (Soy protein)

Native to Indochina, Soy is grown in the warmer regions of temperate zones. Use: The proteins contained in Soy, when combined with White Willow, Arnica Montana, and St. John's Wort (see definitions of White Willow, Arnica Montana, and St. John's Wort) is used to discourage hair growth. It has been proven effective, slowing hair growth and reducing its length and diameter.

 

Squalane

Squalane is naturally obtained from olive oil (see the definition of Olive) and is a concentrated from of the nourishing, softening properties of olive oil.

 

Surfactant

A molecule that makes two insoluble phases inter-soluble. Makes it possible to remove dirt, thus their use in foaming products like shower gel and shampoo. We use surfactants that are gentle to the skin and derived from non-petroleum sources.

 

Tea (black) (Camellia sinensis)

Native to and grown in India, Ceylon, and China, there are thousands of varieties of teas. Traditional use: Tea leaves are the source of a caffeine-rich extract, a well-known active ingredient for slimming products.

 

Tea (green) (Camelia sinensis)

Native to and grown in India, Ceylon, and China, there are thousands of varieties of teas. Use: Tea leaves are the source of an extract with properties that accelerate the basal metabolic rate (increased energy consumption by the body), hence its use in slimming food supplements.

 

Triclosan

An active molecule that helps limit the development of body odor.

 

Vitamin C

Used in cosmetics for its anti-oxidant properties (fights aging of the skin).

 

Vitamin E

Used in cosmetics for its anti-oxidant properties (fights aging of the skin).

 

White Lupin (Lupinus albus)

White Lupin is native to the Mediterranean and is cultivated there. Use: White Lupin is the source of an active ingredient that has a proven effect on restructuring the epidermis.

 

White willow (Salix alba)

Native to Europe, the White Willow grows primarily in Europe, North Africa and Asia. Use: White Willow bark is the source of an ingredient which, when combined with Soy, Arnica Montana, and St. John's Wort (see definitions of Soy, Arnica Montana, and St. John's Wort), is used to discourage hair growth. It has been proven effective, slowing hair growth and reducing its length and diameter.

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